The collapsing tunnel of healthcare premiums

It seems insane that something so necessary could increase in price so much over a short period of time, but Healthcare premiums have doubled in most states since 2013.

What’s worse is that for some states; Alabama, Alaska, and Oklahoma, it nearly tripled. The ACA’s three tiered structure was created to eat some of those cost increases and ensure that insurers had access to a larger market. The individual mandate helps keep prices from ballooning faster. And the premium credit gave those with low income, access to the market. The ACA was installed to slow the growth of premiums, and yet it outpaced inflation by more than 95%, this often leaves most consumers wondering…why?

There are a number of reasons for insurance premium increases, one has to do with the way companies responded to the ACA. Many retail employers began spreading out workers, opting for more employees, lowering the amount of workers available to receive full-time benefits, Ironically mostly in government-based hourly jobs. Companies began going for less Cadillac plans and focused on silver packages, which caused a sudden surge in middle package buying, increasing the prices overall. But company reactions were a drop in the bucket compared to the next two components.

An aging market

As boomers grow older, their health demands rise; and while hospital use is up, nursing and doctor shortages can create three to four month long wait times for appointments. Boomers’ reliance on pharmaceutical medication outpaces any other generation. Medicare spending in 2015 was $137.4 billion on prescription drugs in 2015, up from $121.5 billion in 2014. Medicare Part B spent $24.6 billion on prescription drugs in 2015, up from $21.5 billion in 2014. A whopping $7.03  billion was on Hep C meds alone which cured maybe ten thousand people, and with nearly 5 million Americans needing treatment it’s easier to see why premiums are rising. But it’s not just meds they need. Surgeries and outpatient services ranging from colonoscopies to knee replacement are up across the nation as our nation ages.

Pharma Bros:
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Valeant Pharmaceutical
s’ Ativan increased by more than 1,264 percent, accounting for $5.3 million in Medicaid drug spending;

Turing Pharmaceutical‘s daraprim increased by 874 percent, accounting for $16 million in Medicaid spending; and

Hydroxycholoroquine sulfate increased by 489 percent.

Each of these increases doesn’t reflect need by the consumer, nor a need for research in development. The price increases are a measure of market control given to exclusivity of production. Investment firms purchase companies with the goal of milking them for investors as they shift focus to their new number one product: their stock. These kinds of moves produce volatility and increase the prices insurers need to set to control for.

As the individual mandate is now set to disappear in 2019,  it raises a serious question, will consumers be able to tolerate Premiums which cost more than their rent/mortgage payments?

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The collapsing tunnel of healthcare premiums

It Takes Two

While missing a dose Harvoni had no ill side effects, I can’t say the same for accidentally doubling up. Last weekend I did just that, the side effects were quick and unpleasant. I was unsure as to whether or not I had taken my pill, and while I know that “if unsure if you’ve taken your RX, don’t” is the general rule, I was mostly certain I hadn’t taken it. So an hour following the first pill, I took my second. I didn’t notice how thirsty I was until the pain began two hours in. I’m prepared for hepatic encephalopathy, ascities, jaundice, fatigue, etc… but what I can find few solutions for is the arthritic mimicry. Joint pain from time to time is one thing, but this infects every subtle movement jarringly pushing me to a slightly less uncomfortable position.

I do not have Rheumatoid Arthritis. However, from time to time I notice the symptoms of HCV mimicking it. It’s more than just standard joint pain, and my heart goes out to those who find themselves suffer from both.

It’s not uncommon for the symptoms to express without other signs of HCV infection. I am lucky in the sense that i find myself with many of it’s symptoms, because without such challenges i may not have known of my affliction as early as i did.

Every joint in my body ached, it hurt to open a door handle. I hadn’t felt this kind of exhaustion and pain in some time. I had one solution in front of me, to wait and see. And so I slept the majority of the next few days. Drinking as much water as I could in hopes to combat my skin’s growing inelasticity. As the days passed, the extra pill’s effects began wearing off.
The RA mimicry that popped up has yet to fully fade, but at this point it’s just the state of my liver.
Nothing happened last week, which in a sense made it an exciting week.
Not because the extra pill had less ill effect than I had anticipated, but rather because of a phone call.
The week prior I had my blood drawn. I had hope that my numbers would show progress. The last few tests had shown overall that my liver function was improving, my numbers were returning to a normal state. And by normal, I mean like everybody else normal. I was constantly surprised at how well my liver function tests were going.

So now we’re here. Rather, we’re back here.

Six months ago. I was able to zero out for the first time, however when the second draw came, there was a discrepancy between the tests. Within a month of finishing my 12 week Sovaldi Olysio treatment I found myself with rapidly elevating bilirubin. Which was only further complicated by a C. Diff infection from some diner food I’d eaten for lunch. A week’s long stay and a potential transfer to the hospital for transplant were real possibilities.

I say this with an uneasy stomach spinning from caution, hope, fear, and unbridled glee.

My viral load is undetectable.

It’s unclear as to exactly when it happened, but it has been the case for at least a week. And with about 10 more weeks to go, things are looking well.
I will have several more tests, one at treatment’s end, another a month following, and yet another in August when I will hopefully reach SVR12.

It takes two. End treatment and SVR 12, Two more tests will show me that I have done, what has taken me ten years, to do. I began my first tests for treatment when I was nineteen, and just this month I turned twenty nine.

So far, nothing has been the best birthday gift I’ve received.

It Takes Two